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Election 2022: Morrison was routed by combination of quiet Australians and noisy ones

Michelle Grattan writes in The Conversation (22.5.22) about the 2022 federal election result, delivering a change of government and a resounding defeat for Scott Morrison's Coalition.

'The rout of Scott Morrison goes beyond the defeat of his government. It has left behind a Liberal party that is now a flightless bird. The parliamentary party has had one wing torn asunder, and its path to recovery will be difficult and painful.

'It has lost a clutch of moderates, and with them the person who would have been potentially the most unifying figure in opposition, Josh Frydenberg.

'Peter Dutton, now the most likely next leader, is divisive within the party and community; he would wield a hard fist against the new government but have trouble rebuilding his own side and changing his style.

'... We don’t yet know whether Albanese will be in majority or minority government, although Labor’s chances of a majority were said to be improving on Sunday. If it were minority government, there are so many crossbenchers he wouldn’t have any trouble securing confidence and supply and passing legislation.

'As leader of the house in the minority Gillard government, Albanese is experienced in dealing with crossbenchers, which would stand him in good stead.'

Albanese wins with a modest program - but the times may well suit him

Frank Bongiorno writes in The Conversation (21.5.22) about Labor's federal election win and what Australians should expect from an Anthony Albanese prime ministership.

'Labor’s successful bid for government - only its fifth victory from opposition since the first world war - was based on an experiment that no one could have known would work.

'It was a small-target strategy of a kind that has never seen Labor come from opposition to government at an election in the federal sphere. It offered a low-key campaign, led by a man with 25 years of parliamentary experience. But no one would see Anthony Albanese as a charismatic figure in the mould of Gough Whitlam, Bob Hawke or Kevin Rudd.

'That might offer Albanese and Labor opportunities. It has raised the expectations of voters as any opposition seeking government must do, but it has not raised them too far. It has been circumspect about what it is likely to be able to achieve in a first term.'

What now for the Liberal Party? A radical shift and a lot of soul-searching

Marija Taflaga writes in The Conversation (21.5.22) about the extent of Scott Morrison's election loss and where this now leaves the Coalition and, in particular, the federal Liberal Party.

'It is incredible the government that led Australia through the pandemic with one of the highest vaccination rates, some of the lowest per capita death rates and, comparatively, a good story to tell on the economy has decisively lost government. How did it come to this?

'... By governing so cynically, the Morrison government eroded the goodwill it would need to see it through the inevitable missteps that occur when governing in extraordinary times.

'After almost a decade in power the Coalition government’s policy legacy is comparatively thin. Instead, its achievements are obscured in the popular memory by leadership instability and the policy churn it unleashed.'

 

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